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LCME Standards & Elements

Breadcrumb

The LCME standards and elements are listed below. Following each element is a brief description of how the UCR School of Medicine is addressing that element, with links to more detailed information where appropriate. LCME's specific standards and elements are in italics, while UCR School of Medicine aspects are in regular text.

Use the expandable table of contents listed below to quickly access specific standards and elements.

Table of Contents


Standard 1: Mission, Planning, Organization, and Integrity

A medical school has a written statement of mission and goals for the medical education program, conducts ongoing planning, and has written bylaws that describe an effective organizational structure and governance processes. In the conduct of all internal and external activities, the medical school demonstrates integrity through its consistent and documented adherence to fair, impartial, and effective processes, policies, and practices.

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Element 1.1 - Strategic Planning and Continuous Quality Improvement

A medical school engages in ongoing strategic planning and continuous quality improvement processes that establish its short and long-term programmatic goals, result in the achievement of measurable outcomes that are used to improve educational program quality, and ensure effective monitoring of the medical education program’s compliance with accreditation standards.

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Element 1.2 - Conflict of Interest Policies

A medical school has in place and follows effective policies and procedures applicable to board members, faculty members, and any other individuals who participate in decision-making affecting the medical education program to avoid the impact of conflicts of interest in the operation of the medical education program, its associated clinical facilities, and any related enterprises.

UCR School of Medicine conflict of interest policies:

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Element 1.3 - Mechanisms for Faculty Participation

A medical school ensures that there are effective mechanisms in place for direct faculty participation in decision-making related to the medical education program, including opportunities for faculty participation in discussions about, and the establishment of, policies and procedures for the program, as appropriate.

The UCR School of Medicine has several formal faculty committees related to the medical education program:

  • Admissions Committee
  • Clinical Faculty Appointments and Advancements Committee
  • Faculty Executive Committee
  • Graduate Advisory Committee
  • Medical Education Committee
    • Pre-Clerkship Curriculum Subcommittee
    • Clinical Curriculum Subcommittee
  • Progress and Promotions Committee
  • Volunteer Clinical Faculty Appointments and Advancements Committee

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Element 1.4 - Affiliation Agreements

In the relationship between a medical school and its clinical affiliates, the educational program for all medical students remains under the control of the medical school’s faculty, as specified in written affiliation agreements that define the responsibilities of each party related to the medical education program. Written agreements are necessary with clinical affiliates that are used regularly for required clinical experiences; such agreements may also be warranted with other clinical facilities that have a significant role in the clinical education program. Such agreements provide for, at a minimum the following:

  • The assurance of medical student and faculty access to appropriate resources for medical student education.
  • The primacy of the medical education program’s authority over academic affairs and the education/assessment of medical students.
  • The role of the medical school in the appointment and assignment of faculty members with responsibility for medical student teaching.
  • Specification of the responsibility for treatment and follow-up when a medical student is exposed to an infectious or environmental hazard or other occupational injury.
  • The shared responsibility of the clinical affiliate and the medical school for creating and maintaining an appropriate learning environment.

The UCR School of Medicine abides by all institutional regulations for establishing and maintaining affiliation agreements with our partners in medical education:

This information is addressed in both the School of Medicine Strategic Plan and by the vice chancellor of Business & Administrative Services

For more information about affiliation agreements, please contact K.A. Aguilar, medical partnership manager.

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Element 1.5 - Bylaws

A medical school promulgates bylaws or similar policy documents that describe the responsibilities and privileges of its administrative officers, faculty, and committees.

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Element 1.6 - Eligibility Requirements

A medical school ensures that its medical education program meets all eligibility requirements of the LCME for initial and continuing accreditation, including receipt of degree-granting authority and accreditation by a regional accrediting body by either the medical school or its parent institution.

Following a full accreditation survey visit February 5-8, 2017, LCME granted full accreditation to the medical education program at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine for a five-year term. The next accreditation survey is scheduled January 23-26, 2022.

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Standard 2: Leadership and Administration

A medical school has a sufficient number of faculty in leadership roles and of senior administrative staff with the skills, time, and administrative support necessary to achieve the goals of the medical education program and to ensure the functional integration of all programmatic components.

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Element 2.1 - Administrative Officer and Faculty Appointments

The senior administrative staff and faculty of a medical school are appointed by, or on the authority of, the governing board of the institution.

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Element 2.2 - Dean’s Qualifications

The dean of a medical school is qualified by education, training, and experience to provide effective leadership in medical education, scholarly activity, patient care, and other missions of the medical school.

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Element 2.3 - Access and Authority of the Dean

The dean of a medical school has sufficient access to the university president or other institutional official charged with final responsibility for the medical education program and to other institutional officials in order to fulfill decanal responsibilities; there is a clear definition of the dean’s authority and responsibility for the medical education program.

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Element 2.4 - Sufficiency of Administrative Staff

A medical school has in place a sufficient number of associate or assistant deans, leaders of organizational units, and senior administrative staff who are able to commit the time necessary to accomplish the missions of the medical school.

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Element 2.5 - Responsibility of and to the Dean

The dean of a medical school with one or more regional campuses is administratively responsible for the conduct and quality of the medical education program and for ensuring the adequacy of faculty at each campus. The principal academic officer at each campus is administratively responsible to the dean.

  • The UCR School of Medicine has no geographically distributed campuses.

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Element 2.6 - Functional Integration of the Faculty

At a medical school with one or more regional campuses, the faculty at the departmental and medical school levels at each campus are functionally integrated by appropriate administrative mechanisms (e.g., regular meetings and/or communication, periodic visits, participation in shared governance, and data sharing).

  • The UCR School of Medicine has no geographically distributed campuses.

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Standard 3: Academic and Learning Environments

A medical school ensures that its medical education program occurs in professional, respectful, and intellectually stimulating academic and clinical environments, recognizes the benefits of diversity, and promotes students’ attainment of competencies required of future physicians.

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Element 3.1 - Resident Participation in Medical Student Education

Each medical student in a medical education program participates in one or more required clinical experiences conducted in a health care setting in which he or she works with resident physicians currently enrolled in an accredited program of graduate medical education.

Resident physicians participate in the education of every UCR medical student. The Office of Undergraduate Medical Education helps to prepare residents to achieve excellence as clinical teachers and role models by requiring every resident in both UCR-sponsored and clinical affiliate residency programs to participate in a cross-departmental residents-as-teachers program based on the evidence-based Bringing Education & Service Together (BEST) curriculum.

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Element 3.2 - Community of Scholars/Research Opportunities

A medical education program is conducted in an environment that fosters the intellectual challenge and spirit of inquiry appropriate to a community of scholars and provides sufficient opportunities, encouragement, and support for medical student participation in the research and other scholarly activities of its faculty.

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Element 3.3 - Diversity/Pipeline Programs and Partnerships

A medical school has effective policies and practices in place, and engages in ongoing, systematic, and focused recruitment and retention activities, to achieve mission-appropriate diversity outcomes among its students, faculty, senior administrative staff, and other relevant members of its academic community. These activities include the use of programs and/or partnerships aimed at achieving diversity among qualified applicants for medical school admission and the evaluation of program and partnership outcomes.

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Element 3.4 - Anti-Discrimination Policy

A medical school has a policy in place to ensure that it does not discriminate on the basis of age, disability, gender identity, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation or any basis protected by federal law.

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Element 3.5 - Learning Environment/Professionalism

A medical school ensures that the learning environment of its medical education program is conducive to the ongoing development of explicit and appropriate professional behaviors in its medical students, faculty, and staff at all locations. The medical school and its clinical affiliates share the responsibility for periodic evaluation of the learning environment in order to identify positive and negative influences on the maintenance of professional standards, develop and conduct appropriate strategies to enhance positive and mitigate negative influences, and identify and promptly correct violations of professional standards.

The UCR School of Medicine Student Handbook describes how the medical school supports a positive learning environment by promoting professionalism among all medical students, residents, faculty and staff members. Three professionalism committees jointly maintain professional standards of all UCR medical students. The Student Code of Conduct and Honor Code address how violations of professional standards are corrected.

The Office of Faculty Development provides professionalism education to all faculty members and resident physicians. All UCR employees are required to participate in periodic professionalism training. UCR’s published policies on misconduct issues deal with both faculty and staff.

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Element 3.6 - Student Mistreatment

A medical school develops effective written policies that define mistreatment, has effective mechanisms in place for a prompt response to any complaints, and supports educational activities aimed at preventing mistreatment. Mechanisms for reporting mistreatment are understood by medical students, including visiting medical students, and ensure that any violations can be registered and investigated without fear of retaliation.

The School of Medicine Student Affairs Office has multiple processes to prevent and report mistreatment. All members of the medical school community receive the UCR School of Medicine policy on medical student mistreatment and are encouraged to report any concerns so that these can be addressed as promptly as possible:

  • Student Grievance Committee - grievance@medsch.ucr.edu, (951)-827-7826
  • New Innovations - confidential reporting through a secured web site.
  • Student Affairs Office - (951) 827-7671

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Standard 4: Faculty Preparation, Productivity, Participation, and Policies

The faculty members of a medical school are qualified through their education, training, experience, and continuing professional development and provide the leadership and support necessary to attain the institution's educational, research, and service goals.

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Element 4.1 - Sufficiency of Faculty

A medical school has in place a sufficient cohort of faculty members with the qualifications and time required to deliver the medical curriculum and to meet the other needs and fulfill the other missions of the institution.

The School of Medicine, in addition to leadership, utilizes a wide range of community-based faculty members, all qualified and ready to fulfill the needs of the institution.

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Element 4.2 - Scholarly Productivity

The faculty of a medical school demonstrate a commitment to continuing scholarly productivity that is characteristic of an institution of higher learning.

Scholarship is an expectation of faculty members in every university academic series. The UCR Academic Personnel Office tracks medical faculty academic productivity for advancement and promotion. UCR has a robust research program with centers for basic science, translational and community-engaged research:

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Element 4.3 - Faculty Appointment Policies

A medical school has clear policies and procedures in place for faculty appointment, renewal of appointment, promotion, granting of tenure, remediation, and dismissal that involve the faculty, the appropriate department heads, and the dean and provides each faculty member with written information about term of appointment, responsibilities, lines of communication, privileges and benefits, performance evaluation and remediation, terms of dismissal, and, if relevant, the policy on practice earnings.

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Element 4.4 - Feedback to Faculty

A medical school faculty member receives regularly scheduled and timely feedback from departmental and/or other programmatic or institutional leaders on academic performance and progress toward promotion and, when applicable, tenure.

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Element 4.5 - Faculty Professional Development

A medical school and/or its sponsoring institution provides opportunities for professional development to each faculty member in the areas of discipline content, curricular design, program evaluation, student assessment methods, instructional methodology, and research to enhance his or her skills and leadership abilities in these areas.

See information on faculty development and upcoming events:

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Element 4.6 - Responsibility for Medical School Policies

At a medical school, the dean and a committee of the faculty determine the governance and policymaking processes within their purview.

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Standard 5: Educational Resources and Infrastructure

A medical school has sufficient personnel, financial resources, physical facilities, equipment, and clinical, instructional, informational, technological, and other resources readily available and accessible across all locations to meet its needs and to achieve its goals.

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Element 5.1 - Adequacy of Financial Resources

The present and anticipated financial resources of a medical school are derived from diverse sources and are adequate to sustain a sound program of medical education and to accomplish other programmatic and institutional goals.

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Element 5.2 - Dean’s Authority/Resources

The dean of a medical school has sufficient resources and budgetary authority to fulfill the dean’s responsibility for the management and evaluation of the medical curriculum.

The dean of the UCR School of Medicine has ultimate accountability for the medical education program. Under the dean’s direct supervision, the senior associate dean for medical education serves as the chief academic officer (CAO) for the medical school. Together, the dean and CAO participate in institution-level planning to ensure that the education program has the resources it requires to deliver the highest quality M.D. education program.

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Element 5.3 - Pressures for Self-Financing

A medical school admits only as many qualified applicants as its total resources can accommodate and does not permit financial or other influences to compromise the school’s educational mission.

On June 30, 2020, Dean Deborah Deas announced that California Governor Gavin Newsom signed a $202 billion budget that allocated $25 million in ongoing funding to the UCR School of Medicine. This additional financial support is helping the medical school to double its planned enrollment over several years from 250 to 500 medical students.

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Element 5.4 - Sufficiency of Buildings and Equipment

A medical school has, or is assured the use of, buildings and equipment sufficient to achieve its educational, clinical, and research missions.

The UCR School of Medicine has ample dedicated space to support its educational, clinical and research missions, including the SOM Education Building, SOM Research Building, Webber Hall, Multidisciplinary Research Building, and access to additional campus-wide facilities.

With the planned class size increase, the medical school is also expanding its buildings and equipment. Construction is underway for the new Clinical Skills & Simulation Suite at the Orbach Library Project. Planned to open in the first quarter of 2021, the new suite will feature state-of-the-art simulation equipment, mock examination rooms, simulated emergency department and intensive care unit facilities, and lounge/study areas for students, faculty and staff. The overall square footage for clinical skills and simulation teaching will expand from approximately 1100 ft.² in the current location to more than 13,000 ft.² within Orbach Library.

UCR's Planning, Design and Construction team is completing designs for the new School of Medicine Education Building 2. Chancellor Kim Wilcox has approved the location for the new building, which will be built immediately south of the current School of Medicine Education Building.

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Element 5.5 - Resources for Clinical Instruction

A medical school has, or is assured the use of, appropriate resources for the clinical instruction of its medical students in ambulatory and inpatient settings and has adequate numbers and types of patients (e.g., acuity, case mix, age, gender).

UCR medical students benefit from many resources for teaching and learning. They and their clinical instructors serve diverse patient populations throughout Riverside County and surrounding areas. In addition to UCR Health facilities and campus-based resources for clinical instruction, are medical students rotate at multiple clinical affiliate sites including:

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Element 5.6 - Clinical Instructional Facilities/Information Resources

Each hospital or other clinical facility affiliated with a medical school that serves as a major location for required clinical learning experiences has sufficient information resources and instructional facilities for medical student education.

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Element 5.7 - Security, Student Safety, and Disaster Preparedness

A medical school ensures that adequate security systems are in place at all locations and publishes policies and procedures to ensure student safety and to address emergency and disaster preparedness.

The UCR Office of Emergency Management maintains a preparedness plan for all campus communities. Click any of the links below for additional student safety and security resources:

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Element 5.8 - Library Resources/Staff

A medical school provides ready access to well-maintained library resources sufficient in breadth of holdings and technology to support its educational and other missions. Library services are supervised by a professional staff that is familiar with regional and national information resources and data systems and is responsive to the needs of the medical students, faculty members, and others associated with the institution.

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Element 5.9 - Information Technology Resources/Staff

A medical school provides access to well-maintained information technology resources sufficient in scope to support its educational and other missions. The information technology staff serving a medical education program has sufficient expertise to fulfill its responsibilities and is responsive to the needs of the medical students, faculty members, and others associated with the institution.

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Element 5.10 - Resources Used by Transfer/Visiting Students

The resources used by a medical school to accommodate any visiting and transfer medical students in its medical education program do not significantly diminish the resources available to already enrolled medical students.

The UCR School of Medicine does not accept transfer students or visiting students.

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Element 5.11 - Study/Lounge/Storage Space/Call Rooms

A medical school ensures that its medical students have, at each campus and affiliated clinical site, adequate study space, lounge areas, personal lockers or other secure storage facilities, and secure call rooms if students are required to participate in late night or overnight clinical learning experiences.

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Element 5.12 - Required Notifications to the LCME

A medical school notifies the LCME of any substantial change in the number of enrolled medical students; of any decrease in the resources available to the institution for its medical education program, including faculty, physical facilities, or finances; of its plans for any major modification of its medical curriculum; and/or of anticipated changes in the affiliation status of the program’s clinical facilities. The program also provides prior notification to the LCME if it plans to increase entering medical student enrollment on the main campus and/or in one or more existing regional campuses above the threshold of 10 percent, or 15 medical students in one year or 20 percent in three years; or to start a new or to expand an existing regional campus; or to initiate a new parallel curriculum (track).

Following a full accreditation survey visit February 5-8, 2017, LCME granted full accreditation to the medical education program at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine for a five-year term. The next accreditation survey is scheduled January 23-26, 2022.

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Standard 6: Competencies, Curricular Objectives, and Curricular Design

The faculty of a medical school define the competencies to be achieved by its medical students through medical education program objectives and is responsible for the detailed design and implementation of the components of a medical curriculum that enable its medical students to achieve those competencies and objectives. Medical education program objectives are statements of the knowledge, skills, behaviors, and attitudes that medical students are expected to exhibit as evidence of their achievement by completion of the program.

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Element 6.1 - Program and Learning Objectives

The faculty of a medical school define its medical education program objectives in outcome-based terms that allow the assessment of medical students’ progress in developing the competencies that the profession and the public expect of a physician. The medical school makes these medical education program objectives known to all medical students and faculty. In addition, the medical school ensures that the learning objectives for each required learning experience (e.g., course, clerkship) are made known to all medical students and those faculty, residents, and others with teaching and assessment responsibilities in those required experiences.

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Element 6.2 - Required Clinical Experiences

The faculty of a medical school define the types of patients and clinical conditions that medical students are required to encounter, the skills to be performed by medical students, the appropriate clinical settings for these experiences, and the expected levels of medical student responsibility.

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Element 6.3 - Self-Directed and Life-Long Learning

The faculty of a medical school ensure that the medical curriculum includes self-directed learning experiences and unscheduled time to allow medical students to develop the skills of lifelong learning. Self-directed learning involves medical students’ self-assessment of learning needs; independent identification, analysis, and synthesis of relevant information; appraisal of the credibility of information sources; and feedback on these skills.

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Element 6.4 - Inpatient/Outpatient Experiences

The faculty of a medical school ensure that the medical curriculum includes clinical experiences in both outpatient and inpatient settings.

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Element 6.5 - Elective Opportunities

The faculty of a medical school ensure that the medical curriculum includes elective opportunities that supplement required learning experiences and that permit medical students to gain exposure to and expand their understanding of medical specialties, and to pursue their individual academic interests.

UCR medical students can choose from dozens of elective opportunities in every medical specialty, both within and outside of UCR. The UCR School of Medicine participates in the Association of American Medical Colleges’ Visiting Student Learning Opportunities (VSLO) program, which facilitates students’ ability to pursue electives away from their home institution.

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Element 6.6 - Service-Learning/Community Service

The faculty of a medical school ensure that the medical education program provides sufficient opportunities for, encourages, and supports medical student participation in service-learning and/or community service activities.

As a community-based medical school, the UCR School of Medicine provides ample opportunities for medical students to give back to their community through service-learning activities.

From the MS1 to MS3 years, students also participate in community service during the Longitudinal Ambulatory Care Experience (LACE).

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Element 6.7 - Academic Environments

The faculty of a medical school ensure that medical students have opportunities to learn in academic environments that permit interaction with students enrolled in other health professions, graduate and professional degree programs, and in clinical environments that provide opportunities for interaction with physicians in graduate medical education programs and in continuing medical education programs.

UCR medical students and students in the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program share the first-year curriculum. All medical students interact directly with these graduate students in both large and small groups including problem-based learning classes. Medical students also work extensively with resident physicians from both UCR-sponsored and UCR-affiliated residency programs.

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Element 6.8 - Education Program Duration

A medical education program includes at least 130 weeks of instruction.

The UCR School of Medicine undergraduate medical education curriculum spans 167 weeks of instruction from the MS1 to MS4 years.

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Standard 7: Curricular Content

The faculty of a medical school ensure that the medical curriculum provides content of sufficient breadth and depth to prepare medical students for entry into any residency program and for the subsequent contemporary practice of medicine.

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Element 7.1 - Biomedical, Behavioral, Social Sciences

The faculty of a medical school ensure that the medical curriculum includes content from the biomedical, behavioral, and socioeconomic sciences to support medical students' mastery of contemporary medical science knowledge and concepts and the methods fundamental to applying them to the health of individuals and populations.

The first two years of the UCR School of Medicine curriculum integrate the science of human biology and disease, connecting these issues to the medical concerns of individual patients and communities. Throughout the third year, students continue their Longitudinal Ambulatory Clinical Experience (LACE), which includes culmination of the LACE program’s three-year Practice Improvement Projects that allow students to apply basic science knowledge to the health of individuals and populations.

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Element 7.2 - Organ Systems/Life Cycle/Prevention/Symptoms/Signs/Differential Diagnosis, Treatment Planning

The faculty of a medical school ensure that the medical curriculum includes content and clinical experiences related to each organ system; each phase of the human life cycle; continuity of care; and preventive, acute, chronic, rehabilitative, and end-of-life care.

Five instructional blocks in the first year of UCR’s medical school curriculum teach students in an intensive, integrated approach to human biological systems. The second year includes four instructional blocks organized by disease processes, followed by a one-week integrative assessment module. Spanning years 1-3, the Longitudinal Ambulatory Clinical Experience (LACE) teaches principles of continuity of care. The family medicine clerkship highlights preventive medicine education, a topic that is also interwoven throughout all four years of the medical school curriculum. Students learn about rehabilitation in the third-year neurology clerkship. The Palliative Care Thread integrates end-of-life care education throughout the undergraduate medical education curriculum.

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Element 7.3 - Scientific Method/Clinical/Translational Research

The faculty of a medical school ensure that the medical curriculum includes instruction in the scientific method and in the basic scientific and ethical principles of clinical and translational research, including the ways in which such research is conducted, evaluated, explained to patients, and applied to patient care.

UCR medical students learn about research throughout all four years of the curriculum.

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Element 7.4 - Critical Judgment/Problem-Solving Skills

The faculty of a medical school ensure that the medical curriculum incorporates the fundamental principles of medicine, provides opportunities for medical students to acquire skills of critical judgment based on evidence and experience, and develops medical students' ability to use those principles and skills effectively in solving problems of health and disease.

The UCR School of Medicine curriculum begins introducing principles of evidence-based medicine during the MS1 year in the problem-based learning curriculum and Longitudinal Ambulatory Care Experience (LACE). Students refine their critical judgment skills during the clinical clerkships, fourth-your rotations and Back-2-Basics curriculum.

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Element 7.5 - Societal Problems

The faculty of a medical school ensure that the medical curriculum includes instruction in the diagnosis, prevention, appropriate reporting, and treatment of the medical consequences of common societal problems.

Early in the curriculum, UCR medical students begin to address the medical consequences of common societal problems through small-group cases (Problem-Based Learning, Doctoring and Clinical Skills series). During the clinical years, students deepen their understanding of linkages between health, disease and societal problems. The Longitudinal Ambulatory Care Experience (LACE) and its Practice Improvement Projects prepare students to address these issues in their future careers.

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Element 7.6 - Cultural Competence and Health Care Disparities

The faculty of a medical school ensure that the medical curriculum provides opportunities for medical students to learn to recognize and appropriately address biases in themselves, in others, and in the health care delivery process. The medical curriculum includes content regarding the following:

  • The diverse manner in which people perceive health and illness and respond to various symptoms, diseases, and treatments.
  • The basic principles of culturally competent health care.
  • Recognition of the impact of disparities in health care on all populations and potential methods to eliminate health care disparities.
  • The knowledge, skills, and core professional attributes needed to provide effective care in a multidimensional and diverse society.

The mission of the UCR School of Medicine is to improve the health of the people of California and, especially, to serve Inland Southern California by training a diverse workforce of physicians and by developing innovative research and health care delivery programs that will improve the health of the medically underserved in the region and become models to be emulated throughout the state and nation. From the beginning of their training, UCR medical students learn about health care disparities and how to address them. Core faculty in the UCR Center for Health Disparities Research are actively involved in teaching medical students. The Health Equity, Social Justice and Anti-Racism Thread were appointed in the 2020-2021 academic year, and are developing new cross-curricular initiatives

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Element 7.7 - Medical Ethics

The faculty of a medical school ensure that the medical curriculum includes instruction for medical students in medical ethics and human values both prior to and during their participation in patient care activities and require medical students to behave ethically in caring for patients and in relating to patients' families and others involved in patient care.

Each course and clerkship throughout the four-year medical education curriculum integrates medical ethics and human values. Students begin learning core principles of biomedical ethics in the MS1 year during the Doctoring, Clinical Skills and Problem-Based Learning courses.

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Element 7.8 - Communication Skills

The faculty of a medical school ensure that the medical curriculum includes specific instruction in communication skills as they relate to communication with patients and their families, colleagues, and other health professionals.

In the longitudinal Doctoring and Clinical Skills series at the UCR School of Medicine Center for Simulated Patient Care, medical students begin developing communication skills with focused feedback from faculty mentors and trained standardized patients. The Longitudinal Ambulatory Care Experience (LACE) pairs each student with a primary care physician preceptor. During every weekly LACE session, students refine their communication skills with patients, families and medical colleagues. These skills are continually developed throughout the clinical rotations in year 3 and year 4.

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Element 7.9 - Interprofessional Collaborative Skills

The faculty of a medical school ensure that the core curriculum of the medical education program prepares medical students to function collaboratively on health care teams that include health professionals from other disciplines as they provide coordinated services to patients. These curricular experiences include practitioners and/or students from the other health professions.

UCR medical students are team-taught with students in the UCR Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program through a shared first-year curriculum. During their clinical clerkships, medical students learn to collaborate on inpatient and outpatient health care teams that include both practitioners and trainees from other health professions.

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Standard 8: Curricular Management, Evaluation, and Enhancement

The faculty of a medical school engage in curricular revision and program evaluation activities to ensure that medical education program quality is maintained and enhanced and that medical students achieve all medical education program objectives and participate in required clinical experiences and settings.

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Element 8.1 - Curricular Management

A medical school has in place an institutional body (i.e., a faculty committee) that oversees the medical education program as a whole and has responsibility for the overall design, management, integration, evaluation, and enhancement of a coherent and coordinated medical curriculum.

The Medical Education Committee consists of pre-clerkship course directors and coordinators, clerkship directors and coordinators, the Senior Associate Dean for Medical Education, the associate deans for medical education, and two elected medical student representatives from each class. This committee oversees the medical education program as a whole, focusing specifically on management, evaluation and integration of the undergraduate medical education curriculum.

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Element 8.2 - Use of Medical Educational Program Objectives

The faculty of a medical school, through the faculty committee responsible for the medical curriculum, ensure that the medical curriculum uses formally adopted medical education program objectives to guide the selection of curriculum content, and to review and revise the curriculum. The faculty leadership responsible for each required course and clerkship link the learning objectives of that course or clerkship to the medical education program objectives.

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Element 8.3 - Curricular Design, Review, Revision/Content Monitoring

The faculty of a medical school, through the faculty committee responsible for the medical curriculum, are responsible for the detailed development, design, and implementation of all components of the medical education program, including the medical education program objectives, the learning objectives for each required curricular segment, instructional and assessment methods appropriate for the achievement of those objectives, content and content sequencing, ongoing review and updating of content, and evaluation of course, clerkship, and teacher quality. These medical education program objectives, learning objectives, content, and instructional and assessment methods are subject to ongoing monitoring, review, and revision by the responsible committee.

The Medical Education Committee (MEC) determines the learning outcomes, instructional methods and assessment plans for each medical school course and clerkship. Pre-clinical and clinical education subcommittees are chaired by the associate dean for Pre-Clinical Medical Education and the associate dean for Clinical Medical Education, respectively. The senior associate dean for Medical Education oversees curricular design, review, revision and monitoring.

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Element 8.4 - Evaluation of Educational Program Outcomes

A medical school collects and uses a variety of outcome data, including national norms of accomplishment, to demonstrate the extent to which medical students are achieving medical education program objectives and to enhance the quality of the medical education program as a whole. These data are collected during program enrollment and after program completion.

The Medical Education Committee and its pre-clinical and clinical medical education subcommittees use multiple sources of grouped outcome data to evaluate the medical school’s educational program objectives:

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Element 8.5 - Medical Student Feedback

In evaluating medical education program quality, a medical school has formal processes in place to collect and consider medical student evaluations of their courses, clerkships, and teachers, and other relevant information.

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Element 8.6 - Monitoring of Completion of Required Clinical Experiences

A medical school has in place a system with central oversight that monitors and ensures completion by all medical students of required clinical experiences in the medical education program and remedies any identified gaps.

The UCR School of Medicine’s Office of Assessment and Evaluation monitors medical students’ completion of required clinical experiences.

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Element 8.7 - Comparability of Education/Assessment

A medical school ensures that the medical curriculum includes comparable educational experiences and equivalent methods of assessment across all locations within a given course and clerkship to ensure that all medical students achieve the same medical education program objectives.

The UCR School of Medicine’s Office of Assessment and Evaluation tracks data to monitor the comparability of educational experiences for UCR medical students across all clinical affiliate sites.

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Element 8.8 - Monitoring Student Time

The medical school faculty committee responsible for the medical curriculum and the program’s administration and leadership ensure the development and implementation of effective policies and procedures regarding the amount of time medical students spend in required activities, including the total number of hours medical students are required to spend in clinical and educational activities during clerkships.

On behalf of the Medical Education Committee, the UCR School of Medicine’s Office of Assessment and Evaluation monitors the total number of hours that UCR medical students spend during clerkships for clinical and educational activities.

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Standard 9: Teaching, Supervision, Assessment, and Student and Patient Safety

A medical school ensures that its medical education program includes a comprehensive, fair, and uniform system of formative and summative medical student assessment and protects medical students’ and patients’ safety by ensuring that all persons who teach, supervise, and/or assess medical students are adequately prepared for those responsibilities.

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Element 9.1 - Preparation of Resident and Non-Faculty Instructors

In a medical school, residents, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and other non-faculty instructors in the medical education program who supervise or teach medical students are familiar with the learning objectives of the course or clerkship and are prepared for their roles in teaching and assessment. The medical school provides resources to enhance residents’ and non-faculty instructors’ teaching and assessment skills and provides central monitoring of their participation in those opportunities.

Faculty of the UCR School of Medicine developed Bringing Education & Service Together (BEST), an evidence-based, longitudinal residents-as-teachers program. The entire BEST teaching skills curriculum is available at no charge to other medical educators worldwide, along with the Clinical Teaching Perception Inventory (CTPI) Q-sort instrument for teacher self-assessment, residents-as-teachers videos, and other materials.

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Element 9.2 - Faculty Appointments

A medical school ensures that supervision of medical student learning experiences is provided throughout required clerkships by members of the school’s faculty.

All instructors who teach UCR medical students undergo periodic review to ensure that each holds an appropriate faculty appointment. The Office of Academic Affairs monitors reappointment procedures.

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Element 9.3 - Clinical Supervision of Medical Students

A medical school ensures that medical students in clinical learning situations involving patient care are appropriately supervised at all times in order to ensure patient and student safety, that the level of responsibility delegated to the student is appropriate to the student’s level of training, and that the activities supervised are within the scope of practice of the supervising health professional.

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Element 9.4 - Assessment System

A medical school ensures that, throughout its medical education program, there is a centralized system in place that employs a variety of measures (including direct observation) for the assessment of student achievement, including students’ acquisition of the knowledge, core clinical skills (e.g., medical history-taking, physical examination), behaviors, and attitudes specified in medical education program objectives, and that ensures that all medical students achieve the same medical education program objectives.

With input from Medical Education Committee, the Office of Assessment and Evaluation maintains a centralized system for assessment of medical student achievement.

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Element 9.5 - Narrative Assessment

A medical school ensures that a narrative description of a medical student’s performance, including non-cognitive achievement, is included as a component of the assessment in each required course and clerkship of the medical education program whenever teacher-student interaction permits this form of assessment.

Every assessment form in each required course and clerkship of the medical education program includes a narrative description of a medical student’s performance.

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Element 9.6 - Setting Standards of Achievement

A medical school ensures that faculty members with appropriate knowledge and expertise set standards of achievement in each required learning experience in the medical education program.

The Medical Education Committee sets the medical education program’s standards of achievement in each required learning experience.

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Element 9.7 - Formative Assessment and Feedback

The medical school's curricular governance committee ensures that each medical student is assessed and provided with formal formative feedback early enough during each required course or clerkship to allow sufficient time for remediation. Formal feedback occurs at least at the midpoint of the course or clerkship. A course or clerkship less than four weeks in length provides alternate means by which medical students can measure their progress in learning.

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Element 9.8 - Fair and Timely Summative Assessment

A medical school has in place a system of fair and timely summative assessment of medical student achievement in each course and clerkship of the medical education program. Final grades are available within six weeks of the end of a course or clerkship.

Individual course and clerkship directors oversee the timeliness of grade submission. Direct supervision of grade submission is the responsibility of the associate deans for pre-clinical and clinical medical education. The senior associate dean for medical education provides direct oversight of adherence to approved policy. The Medical Education Committee regularly monitors adherence to the grade submission policy during the course of the academic year.

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Element 9.9 - Student Advancement and Appeal Process

A medical school ensures that the medical education program has a single set of core standards for the advancement and graduation of all medical students across all locations. A subset of medical students may have academic requirements in addition to the core standards if they are enrolled in a parallel curriculum. A medical school ensures that there is a fair and formal process for taking any action that may affect the status of a medical student, including timely notice of the impending action, disclosure of the evidence on which the action would be based, an opportunity for the medical student to respond, and an opportunity to appeal any adverse decision related to advancement, graduation, or dismissal.

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Standard 10: Medical Student Selection, Assignment, and Progress

A medical school establishes and publishes admission requirements for potential applicants to the medical education program and uses effective policies and procedures for medical student selection, enrollment, and assignment.

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Element 10.1 - Premedical Education/Required Coursework

Through its requirements for admission, a medical school encourages potential applicants to the medical education program to acquire a broad undergraduate education that includes the study of the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences, and confines its specific premedical course requirements to those deemed essential preparation for successful completion of its medical curriculum.

Admission requirements for the UCR School of Medicine include:

  • Competence in English, both written and spoken.
  • Capacity for quantitative thinking, represented by mastery of mathematics, science and scientific method.
  • A foundation for an ever-increasing insight in human behavior, thought and aspiration, through study of humans and their society, as revealed by the social sciences and the humanities.
  • Required prerequisite courses:
    • Mathematics (12 quarter units) to include introductory calculus and statistics
    • English (12 quarter units) to include the study of English composition
    • General college physics with laboratory (12 quarter units)
    • College chemistry with laboratory to include inorganic and organic chemistry (24 quarter units)
    • General biology with laboratory (12 quarter units)
    • Prerequisite courses that are recommended but not required:
    • A one-quarter course in biochemistry
    • Spanish
    • Humanities
  • Read more about UCR School of Medicine admission requirements

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Element 10.2 - Final Authority of Admission Committee

The final responsibility for accepting students to a medical school rests with a formally constituted admission committee. The authority and composition of the committee and the rules for its operation, including voting privileges and the definition of a quorum, are specified in bylaws or other medical school policies. Faculty members constitute the majority of voting members at all meetings. The selection of individual medical students for admission is not influenced by any political or financial factors.

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Element 10.3 - Policies Regarding Student Selection/Progress and Their Dissemination

The faculty of a medical school establish criteria for student selection and develop and implement effective policies and procedures regarding, and make decisions about, medical student application, selection, admission, assessment, promotion, graduation, and any disciplinary action. The medical school makes available to all interested parties its criteria, standards, policies, and procedures regarding these matters.

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Element 10.4 - Characteristics of Accepted Applicants

A medical school selects applicants for admission who possess the intelligence, integrity, and personal and emotional characteristics necessary for them to become competent physicians.

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Element 10.5 - Technical Standards

A medical school develops and publishes technical standards for the admission, retention, and graduation of applicants or medical students in accordance with legal requirements.

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Element 10.6 - Content of Informational Materials

A medical school’s academic bulletin and other informational, advertising, and recruitment materials present a balanced and accurate representation of the mission and objectives of the medical education program, state the academic and other (e.g., immunization) requirements for the MD degree and all associated joint degree programs, provide the most recent academic calendar for each curricular option, and describe all required courses and clerkships offered by the medical education program.

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Element 10.7 - Transfer Students

A medical school ensures that any student accepted for transfer or admission with advanced standing demonstrates academic achievements, completion of relevant prior coursework, and other relevant characteristics comparable to those of the medical students in the class that he or she would join. A medical school accepts a transfer medical student into the final year of a medical education program only in rare and extraordinary personal or educational circumstances.

The UCR School of Medicine does not accept transfer students or students with advanced standing into the medical education program.

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Element 10.8 - Visiting Students

A medical school does all of the following:

  • Verifies the credentials of each visiting medical student.
  • Ensures that each visiting medical student demonstrates qualifications comparable to those of the medical students the visiting student would join in educational experiences.
  • Maintains a complete roster of visiting medical students.
  • Approves each visiting medical student’s assignments.
  • Provides a performance assessment for each visiting medical student.
  • Establishes health-related protocols for such visiting medical students.
  • Identifies the administrative office that fulfills each of these responsibilities.

The UCR School of Medicine does not accept transfer students or students with advanced standing into the medical education program.

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Element 10.9 - Student Assignment

A medical school assumes ultimate responsibility for the selection and assignment of medical students to each location and/or parallel curriculum (i.e., track) and identifies the administrative office that fulfills this responsibility. A process exists whereby a medical student with an appropriate rationale can request an alternative assignment when circumstances allow for it.

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Standard 11: Medical Student Academic Support, Career Advising, and Educational Records

A medical school provides effective academic support and career advising to all medical students to assist them in achieving their career goals and the school’s medical education program objectives. All medical students have the same rights and receive comparable services.

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Element 11.1 - Academic Advising

A medical school has an effective system of academic advising in place for medical students that integrates the efforts of faculty members, course and clerkship directors, and student affairs staff with its counseling and tutorial services and ensures that medical students can obtain academic counseling from individuals who have no role in making assessment or promotion decisions about them.

The Academic Counseling and Success Programs assist students in developing effective study, time management and organizational skills in order to minimize distractions, anxiety and stress and to maximize success as a medical student. Individual meetings allow students the opportunity to identify their learning style, identify academic strengths and weaknesses and develop an individualized study plan.

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Element 11.2 - Career Advising

A medical school has an effective career advising system in place that integrates the efforts of faculty members, clerkship directors, and student affairs staff to assist medical students in choosing elective courses, evaluating career options, and applying to residency programs

The Specialty/Career Advisors Program works in conjunction with the AAMC Careers in Medicine, using committed faculty and staff advisors who provide personal advice to medical students. Advisors help students set career goals, evaluate obstacles and provide guidance in choosing their specialty and residency.

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Element 11.3 - Oversight of Extramural Electives

If a medical student at a medical school is permitted to take an elective under the auspices of another medical school, institution, or organization, a centralized system exists in the dean’s office at the home school to review the proposed extramural elective prior to approval and to ensure the return of a performance assessment of the student and an evaluation of the elective by the student. Information about such issues as the following are available, as appropriate, to the student and the medical school in order to inform the student’s and the school’s review of the experience prior to its approval:

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Element 11.4 - Provision of MSPE

A medical school provides a Medical Student Performance Evaluation required for the residency application of a medical student only on or after October 1 of the student's final year of the medical education program.

The earliest date for release of the MSPE is October 1st during the medical student’s final year of medical training.

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Element 11.5 - Confidentiality of Student Educational Records

At a medical school, medical student educational records are confidential and available only to those members of the faculty and administration with a need to know, unless released by the student or as otherwise governed by laws concerning confidentiality.

The student’s admission file – composed of the AMCAS application, supplemental application, transcripts, letters of recommendation, and interview records – is securely maintained by the UCR School of Medicine Student Affairs Admissions Office.

Each student’s administrative file contains registration materials, a signed acknowledgement form indicating the student has been provided the UCR School of Medicine Student Handbook and has reviewed the major policies in the handbook (this is done during orientation week), photo waiver form, HIPAA forms, letters pertaining to leave, counseling memos and letters, and notes from meetings with student affairs staff. These are maintained in the Student Affairs Registrar’s Office in a locked file.

Health clearance forms and immunization records are maintained separately from the administrative file, and, as is the same for all student records, are secured in a locked file cabinet in the Office of Student Affairs that remains locked when not in use.

Student course evaluations are housed electronically with the Office of Medical Education, and medical student progress and promotions forms are maintained in the Student Affairs Registrar’s Office.

Each student’s financial aid file is maintained in the secured UCR School of Medicine Financial Aid Office. This file also has copies of any scholarship award letters.

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Element 11.6 - Student Access to Educational Records

A medical school has policies and procedures in place that permit a medical student to review and to challenge the student’s educational records, including the Medical Student Performance Evaluation, if the student considers the information contained therein to be inaccurate, misleading, or inappropriate.

UCR medical students may view their evaluations and records in person at any time via the online New Innovations system. For evaluations that are stored on paper, students may view their records within five business days of the request by contacting the appropriate person (e.g., Registrar, pre-clinical or clerkship director) for assistance. The student paper records must be reviewed in the Office of the Registrar as these records are not permitted to be removed from the office where it is safely secured. Students requesting paper copies of their records need to make their request in writing. This request will be granted within a period of 45 days as per FERPA regulations. Students do not have access to the confidential components of their admissions file – which includes letters of recommendation, as well as interviewer and admission committee notes.

If a student believes his or her record is inaccurate, he or she will first review the record with the registrar and, if validated, have the record corrected. If students wish to challenge a grade or course evaluations, they may appeal directly to the block director or clerkship director. Appeals of any decision are reviewed by the senior associate dean for medical education. If a remedy is not forthcoming, an appeal can be made to the medical school Progress and Promotions Committee, followed by an appeal to the FEC, and with a final appeal made to the dean.

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Standard 12: Medical Student Health Services, Personal Counseling, and Financial Aid Services

A medical school provides effective student services to all medical students to assist them in achieving the program’s goals for its students. All medical students have the same rights and receive comparable services.

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Element 12.1 - Financial Aid/Debt Management Counseling/Student Educational Debt

A medical school provides its medical students with effective financial aid and debt management counseling and has mechanisms in place to minimize the impact of direct educational expenses (i.e., tuition, fees, books, supplies) on medical student indebtedness.

Overall management and oversight of financial aid resources for the UC Riverside School of Medicine is the responsibility of the School of Medicine financial aid director, housed within the Office of Student Affairs in the Medical Education Building.

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Element 12.2 - Tuition Refund Policy

A medical school has clear policies for the refund of a medical student’s tuition, fees, and other allowable payments (e.g., payments made for health or disability insurance, parking, housing, and other similar services for which a student may no longer be eligible following withdrawal).

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Element 12.3 - Personal Counseling/Well-Being Programs

A medical school has in place an effective system of personal counseling for its medical students that includes programs to promote their well-being and to facilitate their adjustment to the physical and emotional demands of medical education.

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Element 12.4 - Student Access to Health Care Services

A medical school provides its medical students with timely access to needed diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic health services at sites in reasonable proximity to the locations of their required educational experiences and has policies and procedures in place that permit students to be excused from these experiences to seek needed care.

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Element 12.5 - Non-Involvement of Providers of Student Health Services in Student Assessment/Location of Student Health Records

The health professionals who provide health services, including psychiatric/psychological counseling, to a medical student have no involvement in the academic assessment or promotion of the medical student receiving those services, excluding exceptional circumstances. A medical school ensures that medical student health records are maintained in accordance with legal requirements for security, privacy, confidentiality, and accessibility.

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Element 12.6 - Student Health and Disability Insurance

A medical school ensures that health insurance and disability insurance are available to each medical student and that health insurance is also available to each medical student’s dependents.

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Element 12.7 - Immunization Requirements and Monitoring

A medical school follows accepted guidelines in determining immunization requirements for its medical students and monitors students’ compliance with those requirements.

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Element 12.8 - Student Exposure Policies/Procedures

A medical school has policies in place that effectively address medical student exposure to infectious and environmental hazards, including the following:

  • The education of medical students about methods of prevention.
  • The procedures for care and treatment after exposure, including a definition of financial responsibility.
  • The effects of infectious and environmental disease or disability on medical student learning activities.

All registered medical students (including visiting students) are informed of these policies before undertaking any educational activities that would place them at risk.

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